Management Objectives

State the objectives of management, and how sustainable forest management is to be achieved. Objectives are a set of specific, quantifiable statements that represent what needs to happen to achieve the long term vision.

1) Maintain the existing broadleaf and coppice areas as mixed species broadleaf.

  • General Forestry Practice – Good forest practice requirement: 14 – Forests should be designed to achieve a diverse structure of habitat, and species and ages of trees, appropriate to the scale and context.

2) Increase woodland biodiversity.

  • Forests and Biodiversity – Legal requirement: 1 – appropriate protection and conservation must be afforded where sites, habitats and species are subject to the legal provisions of EU directives and UK and country legislation. Advice can be obtained from the relevant authorities on minimising potentially adverse effects for management activity likely to affect them. For Natura 2000 sites likely to be affected, an appropriate assessment is required. 3 – The implications of woodland creation and management for biodiversity in the wider environment should be considered, including the roles of forest habitats and open habitats in ecological connectivity.
  • Forests and Biodiversity – Good forest practice requirement: 1 – Forests and woodlands should be managed in a way that conserves or enhances biodiversity; opportunities for enhancing biodiversity should be considered in forest management plans.

3) Provide an attractive, stimulating, educational and safe environment for friends, family and invited guests.

  • Forests and People – Good forestry practice requirement: 3 – Where public access for recreation and other responsible uses is well established and recognised as a public benefit, or a potential benefit, consideration should be given to the design and provision of appropriate facilities.
  • Forests and People – Legal requirement: 8 – Responsibilities under health and safety legislation must be complied with in relation to employees, contractors, volunteers and other people who may be affected by their work.

4) Create an Open Habitat location that can be used as a picnic area and overnight camping spot

  • Forests and Biodiversity – Good forestry practice requirement: 3 – The implications of woodland creation and management for biodiversity in the wider environment should be considered, including the roles of forest habitats and open habitats in ecological connectivity.

Last Updated: